Why bother?

Last week I attended the ETAI (English Teachers’ Association of Israel) National Conference. In addition to the wide variety of lectures and workshops, we were given a chance to ask a panel, student-style, questions beginning with “Why bother”. Most of us added “when…” such as “Why bother coming to a conference when we can meet online?” (short answer – the importance of face to face contact). Sometimes the most logical answer was “Don’t bother”, but one question really bothered me and I wish I had been able to answer –
     “Why bother having an English Day when my colleagues don’t cooperate?”
Honestly, I barely see a connection between the two clauses (a word I picked up substituting in formal English classes). We don’t have English Days for our colleagues, we have them for our students. English Day is a chance for students to have a positive experience in English,  and no matter what activities you choose they probably will learn something. It’s a way to show them English as a spoken language and culture in a relaxed atmosphere. Whether they perform on stage, make crafts or play games, they will have achievements to remember that aren’t graded.
It’s unfortunate that there are teachers who aren’t willing to put in the extra effort to do something special for their students, but don’t let that stop you from doing your best.
Why bother teaching at all? Why bother preparing interesting activities, paying extra attention to students who are struggling as well as those who want to be challenged more, and making sure that everyone understands before you continue? If you do this to impress your colleagues, you will probably be disappointed by their reactions. But if you do everything you can to help your students, in the long run your efforts will pay off and you’ll have the satisfaction of knowing that you made a difference.
And when your colleagues see this, they may decide in the future to join you.

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